News

The world is changing, with new challenges relating to people and the planet. Pension money is vulnerable to these challenges, but it also possesses the power to contribute to solutions for the most pressing environmental and social issues of our time.

The last two months have been very productive ones for the Institute. We have been making progress on several different workstreams, including the compatibility of pension trustees’ fiduciary duty and impact investing, impact measurement, management and reporting in the social housing sector.

In my first blogpost of the international series, I suggested that “resilience” should be our new North Star as impact-minded investors – the guiding principle to ensure that we build sufficient resource capacity to absorb adversity and avoid a slide into economic, social and health despair. COVID-19 has laid bare structural and systemic inequities.

The coronavirus pandemic has raised important questions for the global impact investing community. How can we, as impact investors and advocates, be most helpful in supporting communities respond, recover, and build resilience to future crises? How does the pandemic affect our ability to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals?  

It has been a couple of weeks since we first updated you about our response to the coronavirus crisis, our activities since our launch in November and our plans for the coming months. The human and economic cost of this pandemic has been devastating for individuals, families and businesses and we are likely to experience the aftershocks for a very long time.

With the social and economic repercussions of COVID-19 affecting every corner of the globe, impact investing offers a pathway to building a more resilient future for us all. Resilience is our new north star – the guiding principle that will ensure that we build sufficient resource capacity to absorb adversity and avoid a slide into economic, social and health despair.

We all have pictures and voices in our minds from the last few weeks. For me, the most persistent image is of the migrant workers forced to leave Delhi after lockdown was imposed and walk hundreds of miles back to their home towns, often with no money and nothing to eat.

Small businesses, social enterprises, and charities are vital to our communities. They are also hit hardest by the current coronavirus pandemic and are struggling to access much needed emergency finance to survive this crisis. We put together some useful funding resources for social purpose organisations and investors.

An ambitious £100 million programme of loans and investment is announced today to help get much-needed emergency funding to social enterprises, charities and small businesses in disadvantaged areas affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

It is four months since the Impact Investing Institute had its official launch in Sheffield and London, and like everyone else, we are responding to the coronavirus pandemic and its devastating human and economic costs on communities around the world. 

The Impact Investing Institute is very pleased to see the Charity Commission encourage charity trustees to consider whether their investments are informed by and consistent with their charity’s purposes and values (see this blog by Sian Hawkrigg, Strategic Policy Advisor on behalf of the Commission).

Progress in impact reporting practice will be insufficient to meet society’s global challenges without significant collaborative action by keystone players A new…